Autumn 2017 Courses

Body

Autumn Semester 2017 Courses 

 

Religious Studies

Arabic      Classics     Comparative Studies     English     Hebrew

History     History of Art     Jewish Studies     Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Near Eastern Languages and Cultures     Philosophy     Scandinavian  

Autumn 2016-only Major/Minor Courses     General Interest Courses

Notes in brackets indicate major/minor program requirements met by each course. Please refer to the Religious Studies major and minor pages for detailed program information.


Religious Studies

Religious Studies 2102.01
Literature and Religion
[Major - Comparative/Interdisciplinary]
TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Daniel Reff | 23977
Study of relationships between religion and secular literature; analysis of religious and spiritual elements of literature and film of diverse cultures and historical periods.
Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2102.01H, CompStd 2102.01 (202.01), or 2102.01H (202.01H). GE lit and diversity global studies course.

Religious Studies 2370                                                                                             
Introduction to Comparative Religion
[Major - Core Course; Minor]
TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM | Hugh Urban  | Lecture 14256

This course is intended to provide a general introduction to the comparative study of religions.  It is structured around three fundamental questions: (1) what is (and isn’t) religion? (2) what are the major similarities and differences among the world’s religions? (3) what is religious pluralism and what are some of the challenges that pluralism poses for thinking about religion’s place in the world today?
We will begin by orienting ourselves to the academic study of religions.  We will continue by surveying a range of religious traditions, including Native American religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  Finally, we will try to make sense of the contemporary religious landscape by examining some new religious movements, as well as the rise of religious “nones” and the “spiritual but not religious.” The class is open to all students, no prior knowledge is assumed.  It fulfills GE requirements in Cultures and Ideas and Diversity: Global Studies.
Introduction to the academic study of religion through comparison among major traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc.) and smaller communities.
Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2370H or CompStd 2370H (270H) or 2370 (270). GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.

Religious Studies 3680                                                                                             
Religion and Law in Comparative Perspective
[Major - Core Course; Minor]
TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM | Isaac Weiner  | 34144

Comparative, interdisciplinary approach to studying religion and law. Drawing on concrete cases, historical studies, and theoretical literature, the course explores how the relationship between religion and law has been configured differently in different liberal democracies, such as the U.S., France, and Israel, and what this might mean for contemporary debates. Team-taught w/ faculty in RelStds and History. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for RelStds 3680. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed as History 3680.

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Arabic

Arabic 5701
The Qur'an in Translation
[Major, Minor]
TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Sean Anthony | 33350 and 33351

An introduction, in English, to the literary, religious, and cultural implications of the fundamental book of Islam. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 671. 

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Classics

 

Classics 2220
Classical  Mythology
[Please consult Religious Studies Advising on Major/Minor requirements met by this course before registering]
MoWeFr 11:30AM - 12:25PM | Carolina Lopez-Ruiz | 13966
TuTh 7:05PM - 8:25PM | TBA | 26101

Personalities and attributes of the Greek and Roman gods and goddesses, their mythology and its influence on Western culture.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Classics 222. GE lit and diversity global studies course.

Classics 2220(H)
Classical Mythology
[Please consult Religious Studies Advising on Major/Minor requirements met by this course before registering]
TR 8:00-9:20 | Staff | 13967
TR 9:35-10:55 | Fritz Graf | 13971
WF 12:45-2:05 | Richard Fletcher | 21152
MWF 1:50-2:45 | Laura Marshall | 24970
MWF 11:30-12:25PM | Sarah Iles Johnston | 26169

Personalities and attributes of the Greek and Roman gods and goddesses, their mythology and its influence on Western culture.
Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of department or instructor. Not open to students with credit for Clas 2220 (Classics 222) or 222H. GE lit and diversity global studies course.

Classics 3403
The Hero in Classical Mythology
[Minor]
TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM | TBA | 23125
The development and interpretation of the major cycles of classical saga based on extensive readings in Greek and Roman epic and drama.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 322.

Classics 3404
Magic in the Ancient World
[Major]
MWF 1:50PM - 2:45PM | Sarah Iles Johnston | 34413

An introduction to the theory and practice of magic in the ancient Mediterranean, how people viewed it, and how it survived in later epochs. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 324. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course. 

Classics 4031
Sacred Texts of the Ancient World
[Minor]
TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM | Fritz Graff | 35800

Study of sacred texts from Greece and Rome.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 325

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Comparative Studies

Comparative Studies 3990 (cross-listed in English)
Approaches to Comparative Studies
[Major]
TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM | Katey Borland | 14291

Introduces comparative studies majors to theoretical tools, methods of investigation, and key concepts in comparative studies research and scholarship. Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. CompStd major, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 398.

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English

ENGLISH 2280
The English Bible
[Minor]
WeFr 2:20PM - 3:40PM | James Fredal| 15625
TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Hannibal Hamlin | 24085
The Bible in English translation, with special attention to its literary qualities, conceptual content, and development within history. Prereq: 1110.01 (110.01) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2280H (280H) or 280. GE lit course.

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Hebrew


Hebrew 2241
Culture of Contemporary Israel (cross-listed in Jewish Studies)
[Minor]
MoWe 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Adena Tanenbaum | Hebrew: 25300 / Jewish Studies 2242: 34268
An introduction to the Culture of modern Israel: historical roots, socio-political institutions and developments, and literary and artistic creations reflecting the realities of contemporary Israeli society. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Hebrew 2241H (241H), 241, JewshSt 2242, or 2242H. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in JewshSt 2242. 

Hebrew 2700
Biblical and Post-Biblical Hebrew Literature in Translation (cross-listed in Jewish Studies)
[Minor]
TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM | Daniel Frank | Hebrew: 16010 / Jewish Studies: 21804

Reading and analysis of selected chapters from the Hebrew scriptures and post-biblical Hebrew writings representative of major historical, cultural, and literary trends. Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 370, 370H, 2700H, JewshSt 2700, or JewshSt 2700H. GE lit and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. [Minor]

Hebrew 2703
Prophecy in the Bible and Post-Biblical Literature
[Minor]
TuTh 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Sam Arthur Meier | Hebrew: 25349 / Jewish Studies: 21805
The dynamics of Israelite prophecy and apocalyptic in the context of ancient Near Eastern culture.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 373. GE lit and diversity global studies course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.
By the end of this course, the student will be able to: 1) articulate the essential features of Israelite prophecy as a distinctive social phenomenon in the context of ancient Near Eastern culture; 2) trace the evolution of the phenomenon in Israel from its rise to its decline and ultimate transformation into apocalyptic; 3) identify the nuances and idiosyncrasies of certain individual prophets; and 4) identify the primary contributions of the prophetic phenomenon to the Judaeo-Christian heritage. To achieve these objectives, class lecture coupled with class discussion will form the core of this course, supplemented by outside readings and written assignments. The readings will include primary and secondary sources, providing the student opportunity for exposure to the prophetic literature at first hand while also supplying input from contemporary scholarship.

Hebrew 3210 
The Jewish Mystical Tradition (cross-listed in Jewish Studies)
[Major - Individual Religious Traditions; Minor]
TuTh 12:45-2:05 | Michael Swartz | Hebrew: 33760 / Religious Studies: 35925 / Jewish Studies: 35926

The history of Jewish mysticism from antiquity to the present, with emphasis on its implications for the comparative study of religious experience.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 2210 (376) 2210H (376H), 3210H, CompStd 2210 (376), 2210H (376H), JewshSt 2210, 3210, 2210H, 3210H or RelStds 2210 (376), 3210, 2210H, or 3210H. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in RelStds and JewshSt. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.
Jewish mysticism has been a constant yet controversial undercurrent in Jewish history, ranging from antiquity to the present day. Its adherents have pursued striking visions of God enthroned on a huge chariot; sought to penetrate the mysteries of the divine personality, perceiving both male and female in the One God; followed a manic-depressive false messiah; worshipped God through joyful song and dance; and imbued classical Judaism with meaning and life its originators could never have imagined. The Jewish Mystical Tradition is a look into this way of interpreting Judaism and how it has affected Jewish history. Jewish mystical texts also provide a rare look into the personal religious experience of individual Jews. Using William James's classic Varieties of Religious Experience as a guide, students will probe the human dimensions of these forms of religious statement. Students will also learn how to read a mystical text, and to interpret the rich symbolism of the Kabbalah and other systems of Jewish mystical religion. This is also a course in the comparative study of religion and culture. In exploring Jewish mysticism, students will address questions central to the cross-cultural study of religion: Are all mystical experiences essentially the same? How can we tell the rational from the irrational? Can we reconstruct a person's individual experience from a written text? Is spirituality a force for stability or anarchy in society?

Hebrew 5603
Readings in Rabbinic Literature (cross-listed in Jewish Studies)
[Minor]
W 3:15-6:00PM | Michael Swartz | Hebrew: 33355 & 33356

Study of selected texts and issues in Rabbinic literature, and discussions of the methods by which they are studied. In Hebrew. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs. Cross-listed in JewshSt. 

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History


History 2220
Introduction to the History of Christianity
[Major - Individual Religious Traditions; Minor]
MoWe 1:50PM - 2:40PM | David Brakke | Lecture 24752
Fr 3:00PM - 3:55PM | David Brakke    | Recitation 33157 & 33158
Fr 1:50PM - 2:55PM | David Brakke   | Recitation 24756 & 33156
Fr 11:30AM - 12:25PM | David Brakke   | Recitation 24753 & 24755

Ranging from Jesus to Joel Osteen, this course will study how in 2,000 years the messianic beliefs of a small group of Jews transformed into a worldwide religion of amazing diversity. Our approach will be historical and contextual: how have Christian beliefs, practices, and institutions changed over time and adapted to different cultures? We will consider major developments in theology (from the Council of Nicaea, to medieval scholasticism, to liberation theology), spirituality (from monasticism, to mysticism, to Pentacostalism), modes of authority (from apostles, to bishops, to televangelists), and social structures (from house assemblies, to an imperial church, to base communities). Although we will focus on developments in the Mediterranean, Europe and North America, we will not completely neglect Christianity in Asia, Africa and Latin America. We will learn that “Christianity” has never been a single monolithic entity, but rather an astonishing collection of individuals and groups creating new and diverse ways of living as followers of Christ. Lectures on key themes will be supplemented by recitation sections focused on primary sources.

History 2352
Ottoman Empire 1300-1800
[Minor]
TuTh 8:00AM - 9:20AM | Jane Hathaway | 25331
Studies the political, economic, social and cultural power of the Ottoman Empire from its origins, through the highpoint of its geopolitical power in the 16th century; to its further evolution through the opening of the period of European imperialism, and will examine the Ottoman Empire as a case from which to study the developmental dynamics of patrimonial sociopolitical systems.

History 2452
Modern Jewish History 1700 - Present
[Minor]
TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM | Alexander Kaye | 34147

Study of the history of Jewish communities and Judaism from the early modern period to the early 21st century. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 330.02 or JewshSt 2452. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. 

History 2455
Jews in American Film
[Minor]
W 9:10AM - 11:55AM | Matthew Goldish | 26069

A study of how modern Jews appear in film compared with historical reality. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 332 or JewshSt 2455. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. 

History 2475
History of the Holocaust
[Minor]
TuTh 9:30AM - 10:55AM | Robin Judd | 33062

Study of the state-sponsored murder of millions of Jews and non-Jews by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II. Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 331 or JewshSt 2475. GE historical study course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. 

History 3218
Paul And His Influence In Early Christianity
[Major - Individual Religious Traditions]
TuTh 12:45-2:05 | J. Harrill | 25099

This course investigates the Apostle Paul through a historical and critical study of his own letters and the later legends that grew up around the figure.  Special attention is given to the significance of Paul's life and the competing ways its story was retold, appropriated, or resisted in late antiquity.  Our historical approach means attention to the cultural and religious context of ancient Judaism, Hellenistic culture, and the Roman imperial society in which Paul lived and wrote.  Topics include Paul's creation of a new social world for his congregations, the conflicts that he aimed to solve in those nascent communities, and influential writers (ancient, medieval, and modern) on Paul as a Christian apostle.  The student will study the Pauline literature closely and will be exposed to important secondary treatments of Paul, including areas of controversy in the interpretation of his life and thought.  The course presupposes no prior coursework on the Bible or in the academic study of religion.
Assigned Readings:
The Writings of St. Paul, 2d ed., edited by Wayne A. Meeks and John Fitzgerald (Norton Critical Editions, Norton Co., 2007).
Assignments: Various oral presentations in class, several quizzes, one interpretative essay, and a final examination.
Prerequisites and Special Comments:
This course fulfills Group Global, pre-1750 for history majors.

History 3235
Medieval Europe I, 300-1100
[Minor]
WF 12:45-2:05 | Kristina Sessa | 33358

Study of the development of Western European institutions from the fall of the Roman Empire to the eleventh century. Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 508.01. GE historical study course. 

History 3245
The Age of Reformation
[Major, Minor]
WF 11:10-12:30 | David Brakke | 33361

The history of the Protestant, Catholic, and Radical Reformations of 16th and early 17th century Europe. Prereq: English 1110.xx, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 511. GE historical study course. 

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History of Art

History of Art 2003
The Art and Visual Culture of East Asia
[Minor]
MoWe 11:30AM - 12:25PM | Staff | Lecture 16027
Th 11:30AM - 12:25PM | Staff   | Recitation 16028
Fr 11:30AM - 12:25PM | Staff   | Recitation 16029
Fr 11:30AM - 12:25PM | Staff   | Recitation 24117
Th 11:30AM - 12:25PM | Staff   | Recitation 25182


Art of Asian cultures from ancient through contemporary times. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 213. GE VPA and diversity global studies course.

History of Art 2101 (cross-listed with African American and African Studies)
Introduction to African Art and Archaeology
[Minor]
WF 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Sarah Van Beurden | History of Art: 34971

The Art and Archaeology of Africa with emphasis on the historic cultures of Rock Art (8,000 B.C.), Egypt (3,000 B.C.), Nok (900 B.C.), Igbo-Ukwu (695 A.D.), Ife (1200 A.D.), and Benin (1400-1900 A.D.). Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 216. GE VPA and diversity global studies course. VSP Admis Cond course.

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Jewish Studies

Jewish Studies 2201
Introduction to Jewish Culture, Thought and Practice
[Major - Individual Religious Traditions]
TuTh 2:20-3:40PM | Lynn Kaye | 21815
An introduction to the historical, ideological, and cultural growth of Judaism examined from a variety of methodological perspectives. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 201. GE-Cultures and Ideas, Diveristy: Global Studies
 

Jewish Studies 2242
Culture of Contemporary Israel (cross-listed in Hewbrew)
[Minor]
MoWe 12:45PM - 2:05PM | Adena Tanenbaum | Hebrew: 25300 / Jewish Studies 2242: 25533
An introduction to the Culture of modern Israel: historical roots, socio-political institutions and developments, and literary and artistic creations reflecting the realities of contemporary Israeli society. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Hebrew 2241H (241H), 241, JewshSt 2242, or 2242H. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in JewshSt 2242. 

Jewish Studies 2700
Biblical and Post-Biblical Hebrew Literature in Translation (cross-listed in Hebrew)
[Minor]
TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM | Daniel Frank | Hebrew: 16010 / Jewish Studies: 21384

Reading and analysis of selected chapters from the Hebrew scriptures and post-biblical Hebrew writings representative of major historical, cultural, and literary trends. Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 370, 370H, 2700H, JewshSt 2700, or JewshSt 2700H. GE lit and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in JewshSt. [Minor]

Jewish Studies 2703
Prophecy in the Bible and Post-Biblical Literature (cross-listed in Hebrew)
[Minor]
TuTh 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Sam Arthur Meier | Hebrew: 25349 / Jewish Studies: 21385
The dynamics of Israelite prophecy and apocalyptic in the context of ancient Near Eastern culture.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 373. GE lit and diversity global studies course.  Cross-listed in Jewish Studies.
By the end of this course, the student will be able to: 1) articulate the essential features of Israelite prophecy as a distinctive social phenomenon in the context of ancient Near Eastern culture; 2) trace the evolution of the phenomenon in Israel from its rise to its decline and ultimate transformation into apocalyptic; 3) identify the nuances and idiosyncrasies of certain individual prophets; and 4) identify the primary contributions of the prophetic phenomenon to the Judaeo-Christian heritage. To achieve these objectives, class lecture coupled with class discussion will form the core of this course, supplemented by outside readings and written assignments. The readings will include primary and secondary sources, providing the student opportunity for exposure to the prophetic literature at first hand while also supplying input from contemporary scholarship.

Jewish Studies 3210 
The Jewish Mystical Tradition (cross-listed in Hebrew)
[Major - Individual Religious Traditions; Minor]
TuTh 12:45-2:05 | Michael Swartz | Hebrew: 33760 / Religious Studies: 35925 / Jewish Studies: 35926

The history of Jewish mysticism from antiquity to the present, with emphasis on its implications for the comparative study of religious experience.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 2210 (376) 2210H (376H), 3210H, CompStd 2210 (376), 2210H (376H), JewshSt 2210, 3210, 2210H, 3210H or RelStds 2210 (376), 3210, 2210H, or 3210H. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in RelStds and JewshSt. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.
Jewish mysticism has been a constant yet controversial undercurrent in Jewish history, ranging from antiquity to the present day. Its adherents have pursued striking visions of God enthroned on a huge chariot; sought to penetrate the mysteries of the divine personality, perceiving both male and female in the One God; followed a manic-depressive false messiah; worshipped God through joyful song and dance; and imbued classical Judaism with meaning and life its originators could never have imagined. The Jewish Mystical Tradition is a look into this way of interpreting Judaism and how it has affected Jewish history. Jewish mystical texts also provide a rare look into the personal religious experience of individual Jews. Using William James's classic Varieties of Religious Experience as a guide, students will probe the human dimensions of these forms of religious statement. Students will also learn how to read a mystical text, and to interpret the rich symbolism of the Kabbalah and other systems of Jewish mystical religion. This is also a course in the comparative study of religion and culture. In exploring Jewish mysticism, students will address questions central to the cross-cultural study of religion: Are all mystical experiences essentially the same? How can we tell the rational from the irrational? Can we reconstruct a person's individual experience from a written text? Is spirituality a force for stability or anarchy in society?

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Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Medieval and Renaissance Studies 2514
Golden Age of Islamic Civilization
[Minor]
WeFr 9:35AM - 10:55AM | Hadi Jorati | 25586
Baghdad 786-861 A.D.: Arab, Persian and Greek contributions to Abbasid society; competing visions of correct Islamic belief; and the coexisting (often conflicting) courtly literary culture.
Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Medieval 214. GE culture and ideas and diversity global studies course.

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Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Near Eastern Languages and Cultures 3501
Introduction to Islam
[Major - Individual Religious Traditions; Minor]
TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40PM | Sean Anthony | 18829

Examination of Islam as a world religion, enabling an understanding of its major tenets and beliefs as they are envisioned by insiders and outsiders.  Prereq: English 1100 (110). Not open to students with credit for 351. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.
This course intends to provide an introductory survey of some of the central premises of Islamic beliefs and practices. It aims to delineate not only the development of Islam as a religion and as a system of belief, but also its growth into a multi-faceted and rich culture and civilization that contributed significantly to the currents of world civilization. This would entail a look at the growth of the major intellectual and spiritual traditions within the Islamic civilization as well as the relation of these to the milieu of their production. The course is broad in scope and introductory in level.

Near Eastern Languages and Cultures 3508
Sufism
[Major - Individual Religious Traditions]
WF 12:45-2:05PM | Hadi Jorati | 33446

Examination of the distinctively Islamic mystical and spiritual features of Sufism and the relevance of its historical and cultural context.
English 1100 (110). Not open to students with credit for 358. GE cultures and ideas course.
"Mysticism” and “spirituality” have been highly popular categories in the academic studies of religion, and they have been used use as self-evident, uncontested, and universally applicable categories. In studying Sufism the use of these two analytical categories resulted in an essentialist approach which described Sufism or tasawwuf as the major Islamic mystical tradition within Islam. Instead of focusing on the universality and spirituality of mysticism this course will approach Sufism as an inner, esoteric Islam, which means that its purpose is to offer a religion-specific study of Sufism. The focus will be on the distinctively Islamic mystical and spiritual features of Sufism as well as on the relevance of its historical and cultural context.
We shall study Sufism by focusing on four major themes: Sufi cosmology, knowledge (gnosis), literature and culture. The readings for this course combine a number of interpretative scholarly works with texts written by Sufi authors. Additionally, student groups will be formed to examine and prepare presentations on the new, contemporary way of disseminating Sufi knowledge, and establishing and maintaining Sufi networks: the Sufi brotherhoods’ web pages online.

Near Eastern Languages and Cultures 3700
Mythology of Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia
[Minor]
TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM | J Leidheiser-Stoddard | 25348

An introductory comparative survey of the mythology of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia.  Prereq: English 1110 (110). Not open to students with credit for 370. GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.
This course is designed to provide students with a comparative overview of the mythologies of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Its focus is the stories that were recounted as successful integrators of perceived reality in the context of these two major ancient cultures. As such, it will identify and explain basic theoretical issues involved in the analysis of myth; examine the central narratives that have been preserved from those cultures; and investigate the varied perspectives that characterize the world-views and life-concerns expressed in these texts. By reading representative selections of both primary and secondary sources, students will be exposed to both the ancient texts themselves as well as relevant contemporary scholarship.

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Philosophy

Philosophy 2120
Asian Philosophies
[Major - Individual Religious Traditions; Major - Comparative/Interdisciplinary; Minor]
MoWeFr 11:30AM - 12:25PM | Steven Brown | 34360
TuTh 9:35AM - 10:55AM | TBA | 18858
TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM | TBA | 34361

A survey including at least three of the following philosophical systems of Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, Taoism, and Confucianism.

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General Interest Courses

(not for major or minor credit)

Comparative Studies 2367.07
Religious Diversity in America
MoWeFr 3:00PM - 3:55PM | Puja Batra-Wells | 14267
MoWeFr 10:20AM - 11:15AM | Kati Fitzgerald | 14269
WeFr 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Joanna Toy | 14268

Exploration of the concept of religious freedom and the position of minority religious groups in American society. GE Writing and Communication: Level 2 and Cultures and Ideas and Diversity: Social Diversity in the US.

Hebrew 2367.01
Scripture and Script: The Bible in Contemporary Arts, Media, and Literature
MoWe 11:10AM - 12:30PM | Lynn Kaye | 25492

The Bible is a foundational text for contemporary art, literature, and political discourse as well as a sacred text in some religious traditions. This course examines Biblical reflections in cultural production, with particular focus on the American experience. It also gives students opportunities to see their own cultural contexts anew, and to explore the Bible's possible relevance to our time.
Prereq: English 1110.01 or equiv. GE writing and comm: level 2 and VPA course.

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